Disc storage device can help you get organised


It takes a little bit of thought and imagination to work out how the Imation Disk Stakka will help you. One of the features the product marketing really pushes — that it has no CD or DVD drive — seems a strange thing to publicise.

It’s somewhat of a deceiving product, actually. To look at it and read just a little of what it does, you’d expect the Disk Stakka to read and retrieve data from the discs is stores.

Not so, and for good reason, according to Imation; a disc reader will inherently render itself obsolete eventually. The Disk Stakka is a disc storage rather than a data storage solution. The question is, will that be enough to ensure the success of the product, when it appears to do little more than a cardboard box and well-labeled discs would?

Another of it’s selling points is the ability to stack up to five Disk Stakkas on top of each other — the connections on the floor of each machine communicate with the one below it, and they all run from one USB cable. 500 data discs at your fingertips is pretty impressive, but you’d be a pretty disorganized worker to keep 500 discs on your desk to begin with. The 12-inch or so square footprint of the Stakka isn’t inconsiderable and it won’t hide unobtrusively in a corner, especially not with four of its brothers stacked on top of it.

However, if you retrieve data from a large number of discs often, it’s very handy to have them all at your fingertips, and the Stakka is extremely fast and easy to set up and use. It shows up as a separate USB device on your system and the contents of the discs are searchable because you assign a contents file to each disc you put in it, by first reading it with your computer’s inbuilt CD drive. It’s much easier than retyping all the disc contents in a word processing document or spreadsheet.

So it doesn’t suit every circumstance, and while the name makes it sound like something you’d find in the back of a ute with a blue cattle dog and Jimmy Barnes blaring from the cab, it’s an inexpensive solution to mass disc storage.


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